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Marie Laveau

New Orleans Voodoo Queen

Although there is plenty of information about Marie Laveau and her daughter and namesake in the legends and lore of Old New Orleans, known as Marie II, separating the fact from the myth has always been a challenge for those seeking a true history of this famous New Orleans icon. Nearly everything that is known about them originates in the secretive oral tradition of the practitioners of Voodoo and that information has been embellished with hearsay and drama, making an already larger than life persona absolutely formidable in the tales that survive.

Among the sites associated with New Orleans voodoo is the tomb of its greatest figure, Marie Laveau. For several decades this "voodoo queen" held New Orleans spellbound-figuratively, of course, but some would say literally, as legends of her occult powers continue to captivate. She staged ceremonies in which participants became possessed by loas (voodoo spirits) and danced naked around bonfires; she dispensed charms and potions called gris-gris, even saving several condemned men from the gallows; and she told fortunes, healed the sick, and herself remained perpetually youthful while living for more than a century-or so it is said (Hauck 1996; Tallant 1946).

Marie Laveau
Franck Schneider after George Catlin
c. 1920s
Oil on canvas

 

Marie Laveau is known throughout the world as “the most famous and powerful Voodoo Queen of North America.” In actuality, this famous icon is really a combination of two people – a famous mother and daughter – who epitomized the sensational and exotic appeal of Africanized Voodoo in 19th and early 20th century New Orleans. Both women thrived against the strong ethnic backdrop of this First American Melting Pot, the gumbo that is New Orleans, and their legend grew along with their patrons. Rich and poor sought them out, first the mother and later the daughter in equal measure, to seek the aid of their dark powers to control lovers, gain fame and fortune, become pregnant, and exact revenge on others important in their lives.

Marie I, the mother, reputedly was born a Free Woman of Color in New Orleans around 1794. She was a mulatto, a person of mixed Black, White and Native American blood. Some legends describe her as a Creole, a descendant of the great French and Spanish aristocracies; still others style her as the daughter of a wealthy white Southern planter and his Negro mistress. It is likely that she may have had the blood of every one of these ethnic groups coursing through her veins.

Marie I’s marriage to Jacques Paris, a Free Man of Color from Saint Dominique (Haiti), is recorded on August 4, 1819: This record lists for the first time the names of Marie I’s parents, listing her as an illegitimate daughter of Msr. Charles Laveau and a Marguerite Darcantrel. Marie was described as tall, beautiful and statuesque, with curly black hair, golden skin and "good" features (then meaning more white than Negro). She and Paris took up residence in a house, supposedly part of her dowry from Charles Laveau, in the 1900 block of North Rampart Street.

Paris disappeared soon after the marriage, perhaps returning to Sainte Dominique. A death certificate was filed five years later without any certificate of interment; Marie then began addressing herself as the Widow Paris. She took up employment as a hairdresser catering to the wealthy white and Creole women of New Orleans and this is considered the root of her enduring legend. For many of the women looked upon Marie as a confidante, confessing to her their most intimate secrets and desires about their husbands and lovers, their estates and families, their husbands’ mistresses and business affairs, and their other heartfelt wishes. What probably began as the delivery of broad-shouldered good advice from one woman to others ultimately grew into a force and a legend that still resonates throughout New Orleans today.

Around 1826, Marie took up with Msr. Louis Christophe Duminy de Glapion, a quadroon also from Sainte Dominique. They lived in Marie’s North Rampart Street house until his death in 1855 (some claim possibly as early as 1835). Although she and Glapion never married, Marie had 15 children by him in rapid succession and ultimately ended her hairdressing career to devote all her energies to raising this brood. But Marie by no means lost a clientele, for as she settled into domesticity on Rampart Street she also set about becoming the legend: The Voodoo Queen of New Orleans.

Voodoo had been secretly practiced by blacks and islanders in and around New Orleans since the first boat loads of slaves arrived from Africa and the Caribbean. New Orleans was always more French-Spanish than English-American, and the slaves had came from the same parts of Africa that had sent blacks to work the French and Spanish plantations scattered throughout the colonial New World. After the blacks had won their independence in the infamous slave uprising in Haiti (1803-1804), the Creole planters escaping the rebellion brought their loyal slaves with them to the friendlier shores of southern Louisiana where the French-Spanish culture was more familiar and welcoming. The slaves were avid practitioners of the ancient Vodoun and Yoruba religions, and although deftly hidden among the intricacies of the prevailing Catholic faith, the old African beliefs thrived as the slave populations grew.

Quickly tales circulated of hidden and secret rituals being held deep in the bayous, complete with the worship of a snake god called Zombi, and orgiastic dancing, drinking, and lovemaking. Almost a third of the worshippers were white, desirous of obtaining the "power" that was promised by the priests and mambos directing these rituals. These meetings frightened the white population. Many slave owners began to fear that the blacks were planning an uprising against them, as had happened in Haiti. As a result, in 1817, the New Orleans Municipal Council passed a resolution forbidding blacks to gather for dancing or any other purpose except on Sundays, and only in places designated by the mayor. The accepted spot in the City was Congo Square on North Rampart Street, now located adjacent to Armstrong Park. Blacks, most of them voodooists, met, danced and sang in the stylized rituals, overtly worshipping their gods while entertaining (and frightening) the whites with their Africano "gibberish".

By the 1830’s there were many voodoo mambos in New Orleans, fighting over control of the Sunday Congo Square dances and the secret ceremonies still held on the shores of Lake Pontchartrain. But when "Mamzelle" Marie Laveau stepped forward to begin her reign, contemporaries reported the other queens faded before her; some succumbing to her powerful gris-gris, some being physically driven away by the brute force of Marie’s growing mass of followers. Marie also gained control of the Congo Square Dances by entering before all the other dancers and entertaining the fascinated onlookers with her snake.

Marie knew the sensation that the rituals at the lake were causing and used it to further the purposes of the voodoo movement in New Orleans. She invited the public, press, police, the New Orleans roués, and others thrill-seekers of the forbidden fun to attend. Charging admission made voodoo profitable for the first time. Marie was always a devout, practicing Catholic and she added influences of that religion -holy water, incense, statues of the saints, and Christian prayers - to the already sensational ceremonies of Voodoo.

Her entrepreneurial efforts went even further by organizing secret orgies for wealthy white men seeking beautiful black, mulatto and quadroon women for mistresses. Marie presided over these meetings herself and they invariably became “secret” public knowledge. Eventually, Marie Laveau, with all of the secret knowledge which she had gained from the Creole boudoirs combined with her own considerable knowledge of spells along with her undeniable magical abilities, became the most powerful woman in New Orleans. Whites of every class sought her help in their various affairs and amours while blacks saw her as their leader. Judges paid her as much as $1000 to assure victory in elections; other whites paid $10 (a high fee at the time) for an insignificant love powder. But she never charged the black community for her services.

At the age of 70, in 1869, Marie gave her last performance as a voodoo queen. She announced she was retiring and retired to a home located on the more peaceful St. Ann Street in the Old Quarter. But she never completely retired. She continued her work until at least 1875, when she is said to have been active visiting the poor and imprisoned and still giving readings in her home.

On June 16, 1881, Marie I, Widow Paris, died in her St. Ann Street house. Reporters of the day painted her in the most glorious terms, a saintly figure of 98 (actually 87), who nursed the sick, and prayed incessantly with the diseased and condemned. Reporters called her the recipient "in the fullest degree" of the "heredity gift of beauty" in the Laveau family, who gained the notice of Governor Claiborne, French General Humbert, Aaron Burr, and even the Marquis de Lafayette. Her obituaries claimed she lived a pious life surrounded by her Catholic religion, with no mention of her Voodoo past. Even one of her surviving children, Madame Legendre, claimed her saintly mother never practiced Voodoo and despised the cult.

Then a similar tall woman with flashing black eyes, and the ability to control lives, emerged as Marie Laveau II.

Marie Laveau Glapion was born February 2, 1827, one of the 15 children crowding first the home on Rampart Street and then the St. Ann Street cottage. It was never known whether her mother, Marie I, chose the role for her daughter, or whether Marie II chose the role herself to follow in her mother’s footsteps. By most accounts she shared her mother’s features to an extraordinary degree, a virtual replica of Marie I. Others say the pupils of her eyes were half-moon shaped and this is how you could tell daughter from mother. Apparently, Marie II lacked the warmth and compassion of her mother because she seems to have inspired more fear and subservience than her mother did. Like her mother before her, she began work as a hairdresser; eventually, however, she abandoned that profession to run a bar and brothel on Bourbon Street, between Toulouse and Saint Peter.

Marie continued operations at the "Maison Blanche" (White House), the house which her mother allegedly had built for secret voodoo meetings and liaisons between white men and black women. Marie II was proclaimed to be a talented procuress, able to fulfill any man’s desires for a price. Lavish parties were held at the Maison Blanche offering champagne, fine food, wine, music, and naked black girls dancing for white men, politicians, and high officials. They were never raided by the police who feared that if they crossed Marie she might "hoodoo" them.

Marie II continued in the rich traditions and persona of the Voodoo Queen began by her mother so many years before. The Saint John's Day celebrations were especially connected to the Voodoo rituals of the time, celebrated along the shores of St. John’s Bayou where it met the waters of Lake Pontchartrain. The St. John celebration of 1872 was distinguished by the presence of both mother and daughter and began as a religious ceremony in the tradition of Marie I. She came with a crowd singing. Soon a cauldron was boiling with water from a beer barrel, into which went salt, black pepper, a black cat, a black rooster, a various powders, and a snake sliced in three pieces representing the Trinity. With all this boiling the practitioners ate, whether the contents of the cauldron or not is not known. Afterwards or during the feast was more singing, appropriately to "Mamzelle Marie." Then it was cooling off time at which all stripped and swam in the lake. This was followed by a sermon by Marie II, then a half hour of relaxation, or sexual intercourse. Then four naked girls put the contents of the cauldron back into the beer barrel. Marie I gave another sermon, by this time it was becoming daylight and all headed for home. Marie II continued these yearly rituals throughout her lifetime.

Strangely, although Marie I seemed almost to fade into obscurity, Marie II "died" well within in the public eye. Since the public had never made a true distinction between mother and daughter, the death of one ended the career of the other. Marie II still reigned over the voodoo ceremonies of the blacks and ran the Maison Blanche, but she never regained high notice in the press. Supposedly she drowned in a big storm in Lake Pontchartrain in the 1890s, but some people claimed to have seen her as late as 1918.

Death did not end the power of the Great Marie Laveau.

Mrie Laveauxs' Tomb in St Louis Cemetery Number 1.

Though the Widow Paris is reportedly buried in the family crypt in St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, the vault bears the name of Marie Philome Glapion, deceased June 11, 1897. If this inscription is correct, this would rightly be the burial place of Marie II. But the vault still attracts the curious and the faithful from all corners of the globe and gifts of food, money, flowers, candles, and artifacts can always be found there. Believers and the simply superstitious ask for Marie’s help in an elaborate knocking and turning ritual, marking the white stone with three crosses of red brick in the effort to write their hopes on her memory.

Curiously, in St. Louis Cemetery No. 2 there is another vault bearing the name of Marie Laveau. This vault has red crosses on it as well and is distinguished as the "wishing tomb” where young women can go to petition the great Voodoo Queen when seeking husbands.

Tomb of Marie Laveau St. Louis Cemetery Number 2

Many cemeteries around New Orleans claim to be the last resting place of one or both of the legendary Laveau women, but the St. Louis No. 1 is recognized as the most accurate location. Still, there are others who insist that the Great Mamzelle never died and that she even visits the cemeteries herself, in disguise, chuckling with amusement at the devotees who honor her legend even now.

A contemporary of Marie II told Tallant (1946, 126) that he had been present when she died of a heart attack at a ball in 1897, and insisted: "All them other stories ain't true. She was buried in the Basin Street graveyard they call St. Louis No. I, and she was put in the same tomb with her mother and the rest of her family."



In Search Of The Real Marie Laveau

The following are some factual actual places of interest that any fan of Marie Laveau fans must include for a perfect visit to New Orleans and the haunts of this most famous Voodoo Queen

1801 Dauphine Street Marie -Laveau's father's home

1900 block of North Rampart Street (in Faubourg Marigny) - wedding house from father

1016, 1028, 1022, 1020 St. Ann (originally 152 Rue St. Ann) -house received after helping win a falsely accused rape case (reportedly)

St. Louis No. 1, Crypt No. 3 - reported site of Marie Laveau's tomb

723 Rue Dumaine - New Orleans Historic Voodoo Museum

729 Bourbon Street - Marie Laveau's House of Voodoo

New Orleans Voodoo Queen

MARIE LAVEAU PAGES FOR YOU TO VISIT:

MARIE LAVEAU VOODOO QUEEN ( Here for more.)

Real Marie Laveau Tomb Ghost Pictures

A MIDSUMMER CELEBRATION
IN HONOR OF MADAME MARIE LAVEAU A HAUNTED NEW ORLEANS TOURS EXCLUSIVE!! ( Here for more.)

MARIE LAVEAU STORIES OF OLD NEW ORLEANS

XXX MARKS THE SPOT: DEDICATION OR DESECRATION? CALLING ON THE QUEEN OF THE CITY OF THE DEAD ( Here for more)

MARIE LAVEAUS' HOUSE OF VOODOO (Here for more.)

Marie Laveau and the Devil Baby of Bourbon Street ( Find out more here.)

Expert Uncovers Birth Record of Voodoo Queen Marie Laveau (Learn more here.)

 

MARIE LAVEAU ON THE INTERNET

Voodoo Dreams - Marie Laveau
It was said that sometimes Marie Laveau herself would dance with her large snake, Zombi, wrapped around her. Voodoo worshipers believed that even the snake ...

http://ame2.asu.edu/sites/voodoodreams/marie_laveau.asp

! The Voodoo Queen: Marie Laveau and New Orleans Voodoo
There's much more to Voodoo than the stereotypical witch doctor fiendishly jabbing needles into dolls. The most prominent figure in the true history of ...

http://www.parascope.com/en/articles/voodooQueen.htm

Laveau, Marie
Marie Laveau I, the mother, supposedly was born in New Orleans in 1794 and was considered a free woman of color. Being a mulatto, she was of mixed black, ...

http://www.themystica.com/mystica/articles/l/laveau_marie.html

Marie Laveau - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Alleged portrait of Marie Laveau, which hangs in the Louisiana State Library in ... Marie Laveau also appears in the novel Voodoo Dreams written by Jewell ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Laveau

Voodoo Tomb of Marie Laveau, Voodoo Queen; Investigative Files ...
Among the sites associated with New Orleans voodoo is the tomb of its greatest figure, Marie Laveau. For several decades this.

http://www.csicop.org/sb/2001-12/i-files.html

Marie Laveau - restaurang / bar / nattklubb
This text is replaced by the Flash movie. Marie Laveau. This text is replaced by the Flash movie. This text is replaced by the Flash movie. ...

http://www.marielaveau.se/

MARIE LAVEAU'S TOMB
(Example: "Beautiful Marie Laveau, love queen of New Orleans, please grant ... Answer: Marie Laveau is the most well known American voodoo priestess to have ...

http://www.spellmaker.com/marie.htm

VOODOO IN NEW ORLEANS & MARIE LAVEAU
No study of ghostly tales or strangeness in New Orleans would be complete without mention of Marie Laveau, the unchallenged "Queen of Voodoo" in New Orleans ...

http://www.prairieghosts.com/laveau.html

French Creoles | Marie Laveau
Come on in and learn something new, Read about the forgotten Creole culture of America. Home brewed mixture of African, French, Spanish, ...

http://www.frenchcreoles.com/CreoleCulture/f ... es/marielaveau/marielaveau.htm

Voodoo in New Orleans: Marie Laveau Photos
This was once the house of Marie Laveau II, one of the orignal Marie's fifteen children. It is now a tourist shop called Marie Laveau's House of Voodoo. ...

http://www.geocities.com/bourbonstreet

 

 

 

 

NEW ORLEANS TOP TEN HAUNTED LIST

THE TOP TEN MOST POWERFUL NEW ORLEANS VOODOO PRIESTESSES The following phenomenal women were chosen by our readers as the Top Ten Most Powerful Voodoo Priestesses in New Orleans 2006

TOP TEN HAUNTED NEW ORLEANS BARS According to some locals and experts in the Parnornormal field, the following are are to be considered the Top Ten Most Haunted Bars in New Orleans and are among the best places for possible encounters with, and to see a real New Orleans ghost.

TOP TEN HAUNTED NEW ORLEANS CEMETERIES Considered by locals visitors and paranormal investigators world wide as actually the most haunted Cemeteries in all the United States.

TOP TEN HAUNTED NEW ORLEANS GHOST AND CEMETERY TOURS Here is the list of The Top Ten Haunted Ghost Tours New Orleans 2006, These are considered by Haunted New Orleans Tours and Voted by our readers as the very best 2006 Haunted Tour, Ghost Tours, Vampire, Voodoo, Cemetery Tour, Haunted History, Haunted House, Haunted Swamp and Ghost Walk Tours for you to enjoy and to investigate The Big Easy on your own.

TOP TEN HAUNTED NEW ORLEANS HOTELS If your travel to New Orleans is conference, or just fun related, you will be pleased to know that many haunted hotels are just blocks to the Morial Convention Center, the largest convention center in Louisiana. During Carnival season, the New Orleans Haunted hotels offers an ideal location; as Mardi Gras parades roll only a few blocks away from the grand entrance of these classic New Orleans hotels.

TOP TEN HAUNTED NEW ORLEANS HOUSES New Orleans is often call "The Most Haunted City In America"with urban legends and all kinds of scary ghosts and reported often, real haunted houses, haunted mansions, and Plantations. Many often a few make the claim of being "the mos realt haunted house in New Orleans." And there's quite a bit of anecdotal evidence to support those haunted ghost filled claim.

TOP TEN HAUNTED NEW ORLEANS RESTAURANTS Restaurants included are rumored to be haunted as said by locals, as well as some properties where paranormal activity has been validated or confirmed by leading parapsychologists and paranormal investigators. Many New Orleans restaurants are reported that have had ghostly disturbances. Some Restaurants have played up the haunted tales while others keep the building's ghost sighting and haunting a inside secret.

TOP TEN HAUNTED LOCATIONS TO SEE A REAL GHOST IN NEW ORLEANS Many locals know the best place to experience a one-on-one encounter with some of the resident ghosts and ghouls that haunt New Orleans. Haunted New Orleans Tours has created a definitive guide to some of the city’s spookiest and most ghost-ridden Locations where specters make contact with the living on an almost daily basis. The following list of haunted locations are those most frequently reported to Haunted New Orleans Tours as where ghost are sighted AND most often ghost photos happen frequently.

GHOST TOWN NEW ORLEANS TOP TEN HAUNTED NEIGHBERHOODS AFTER HURRICANE KATRINA New Orleans has always been a haunted town, with ghosts and phantoms literally overflowing the historic areas of town. But post-Hurricane Katrina, some might say ALL of New Orleans is a haunted town; it is certainly a ghost town in most areas.

TOP TEN MOST POWERFUL NEW ORLEANS VOODOO RITUALS Voodoo rituals are a part of everyday life in New Orleans. When asked, locals can recall having witnessed or participated in any number of voodoo and vodoun-inspired rituals in their lifetime. Now Haunted New Orleans Tours present the Top Ten Most Powerful Voodoo Rituals as chosen by our New Orleans readers!

THE TOP 10 MOST HAUNTED PLACES IN THE PINEY WOODS OF ST. TAMMANY PARISH It is a place where the stars are seldom seen, and then only in great splashes through tangled woodland arms. A place where every wind smells of spicy resin, whispering in the voices of bare branches and dead leaves. And in places deep within, where even the moonlight gets lost, it can be a lonely, haunting place.

 

HAUNTED NEW ORLEANS TOP TEN BEST AND MOST HAUNTED LIST FOR YOU TO TOUR AND INVESTIGATE AND POSSIBLY SEE AND EXPERIENCE REAL GHOST OR HAUNTING IN NEW ORLEANS!

 

 

 

 

Notes and Bibliography

Notes
1. Robert Tallant, Voodoo in New Orleans (Gretna: Pelican Publishing Company, 1946), p. 53.
2. Ibid., 54.
3. Jessie Mulira, "The Case of Voodoo in New Orleans" in Africanisms in American Culture, ed. Joseph E. Holloway (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990), p. 49.
4. Adrian Nicholas McGrath, The Voodoo Queen, 5. Mulira, p. 54.

6. Guiley, Rosemary Ellen.
The Encyclopedia of Witches and Witchcraft.
New York: Facts On File, 1989 [ISBN 0-8160-2268-2]

Bibliography

Antippas, A.P. "A Brief History of Voodoo." New Orleans: Hembco, 1988.

Gandalfo, Charles. "Marie Laveau of New Orleans." New Orleans: New Orleans Historic Voodoo Museum, 1992.Haskins, Jim. Voodoo and Hoodoo. Briarcliff Manor: Stein and Day, 1978.

Martinez, Raymond J. Mysterious Marie Laveau, Voodoo Queen. New Orleans: Hope Publications, 1956.

Mulira, Jessie Gaston. "The Case of Voodoo in New Orleans." In Joseph E. Holloway, ed., Africanisms in American Culture. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990.

Tallant, Robert. Voodoo in New Orleans. Gretna: Pelican Publishing, 1956.

 

 

 

 

Marie Laveau's House of Voodoo

New Orleans Historic Voodoo Museum
739 Bourbon St
New Orleans, LA 70116

504-581-3751e

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Cross Street
• St. Ann


• On Bourbon St. between Orleans and St. Ann

 


 

 

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